Pictured are students from Holberton San Francisco collaborating

 

Articles by Holberton Staff

Articles by Holberton Staff

From Living In His Car to Coding Like A Star

A year ago, Max drove across country with a dream and few thousand dollars in savings in his pocket. The drive was long but it was just the beginning; that car would end up being his home in San Francisco. Fast-forward to today, Max was heading back home by plane, with a Software Engineering job in his pocket.

- by Sylvain Kalache on April 16, 2018

Project-based learning coming to disrupt research

School 42 and Holberton School led the way for Software Engineers in the US, with their graduates now working for companies like Tesla, LinkedIn and Apple. And now it’s the research world that is about to be disrupted by the approach.

- by Sylvain Kalache on January 08, 2018

Filling Amazon’s 50,000 jobs means finding new ways to train software engineers in the U.S.

This approach to education is project-based (hands on) and utilizes peer-learning (teamwork). Schools practicing this methodology have no formal teachers and no lectures. Instead, students learn by practicing and collaborating with their peers. This methodology seems at first counterintuitive, as most of us were educated through lectures, and then expected to recall the information we learned during an exam. That is what most college and coding bootcamps use. But it turns out that for many of us, the best way to learn is not to listen to a teacher, but to learn by doing. In this project-based education, students are given challenges and minimum guidance to get started. Then they use their creativity, browse the largest library that has ever existed (the Internet), and work as a team to achieve their goals. Along the way, they seamlessly learn the tools, knowledge, and soft skills that will make them great professionals.

- by Sylvain Kalache on September 18, 2017

Why is the first coding bootcamp closing?

New era colleges taking inspiration from progressive education, focusing on learning by doing via hands-on projects where teachers coach students to achieve their goal instead of feeding them knowledge, are training the types of professionals the tech industry desperately needs. Students work in groups on projects, developing their social and collaboration skills which are key to company's success. Education as we know it is changing. Bootcamps changed the game and took a step toward this change, let’s continue to bring the change to the next level.

- by Sylvain Kalache on August 25, 2017